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𝟒 𝐀𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐏𝐇 𝐕𝐨𝐥𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐀𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐭 𝐋𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥 𝟏 & 𝟐

𝗕𝘂𝗹𝘂𝘀𝗮𝗻 𝗩𝗼𝗹𝗰𝗮𝗻𝗼: Bulusan Volcano remains at Alert Level 1, indicating slight activity. Over the past 24 hours, three volcanic earthquakes have been recorded. Sulfur dioxide emissions were measured at 31 tons per day. There is a weak steam plume rising 100 meters and drifting southwest. Additionally, ground deformation of possible ash fall and take precautions such as wearing masks and staying indoors.

𝗧𝗮𝗮𝗹 𝗩𝗼𝗹𝗰𝗮𝗻𝗼: Taal Volcano also remains at Alert Level 1, indicating slight activity. In the past 24 hours, one volcanic tremor lasting 4 minutes was recorded. Sulfur dioxide emissions were measured at 2517 tons per day as of July 4, 2024. The lake’s pH was measured at 0.20, and the temperature at 72.7°C on February 20, 2024. A strong steam plume reaching 1500 meters was observed drifting southwest. Ground deformation indicates long-term deflation of the greater Taal Caldera with short-term inflation in the northern and southeastern parts of Taal Volcano Island. Residents and visitors should avoid the main crater, Daang Kastila fissure, and the northern and southeastern parts of the island due to the risk of sudden steam-driven explosions and hazardous gases.

𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗼𝗻 𝗩𝗼𝗹𝗰𝗮𝗻𝗼: Mayon Volcano is at Alert Level 1, indicating slight activity. No volcanic earthquakes were recorded, but there is weak crater glow visible only through a telescope. Sulfur dioxide emissions are at 856 tons per day. A moderate steam plume rises 300 meters and drifts in multiple directions. Ground deformation shows short-term inflation of the volcano.

𝗞𝗮𝗻𝗹𝗮𝗼𝗻 𝗩𝗼𝗹𝗰𝗮𝗻𝗼: Kanlaon Volcano is at Alert Level 2, indicating increased activity. Over the past 24 hours, 17 volcanic earthquakes were recorded. Sulfur dioxide emissions are at 4368 tons per day as of July 4, 2024. A moderate steam plume rises 200 meters and drifts south-southwest, and ground deformation indicates inflation of the volcano. Residents and visitors are advised to avoid the 4-kilometer Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) due to potential explosive eruptions.

All residents and visitors near these volcanoes should remain vigilant and stay informed through official updates from local authorities and PHIVOLCS. It is crucial to be prepared for possible evacuations, follow safety guidelines, and avoid restricted zones to ensure safety. Keep emergency kits ready, know the evacuation routes, and maintain communication with local disaster management offices.

For more detailed information, visit PHIVOLCS.
phivolcs.dost.gov.ph

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